new DVDs, reader's advisory

New DVDs – March 2019

The following films have been added to our collection during the month of March.
MPAA ratings follow each title in parentheses, with (NR) denoting the film is not rated.  If a language other than English follows the film title, the film will be in that language with optional English subtitles.

Ben is Back (R)
Can You Ever Forgive Me? (R)
Creed II (PG-13)
The Favourite (R)
Green Book (PG-13)
Instant Family (PG-13)
Mary Queen of Scots (R)
The Possession of Hannah Grace (R)
Robin Hood (2018)(PG-13)
Sanju (Hindi)(TV-MA)

Updated 3/15/19

Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Morning Book Break – February 2019

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Morning Book Break Book Discussion Group on
Varina by Charles Frazier

Rating:
The Morning Book Break Book Discussion group rated the book between a 1.0 and 5.0. The average of the ratings was 3.65.

Review:
Charles Frazier grew up in the South and felt like after Cold Mountain, he did not want to return to the Civil War era. Yet, he felt the subject matter continues to be relevant; we are a country that still hasn’t healed and still hasn’t made peace with the past.  Charles Frazier had no interest in writing about or learning more about Jefferson Davis, but he was interested in the little known Varina Davis.  He thought she was interesting because she said publicly that the right side won.  It was interesting to him that this woman who had benefited so greatly from the plantation in Mississippi was still evolving in her thinking up to her death in 1906.  She became friends with Julia Grant and they wanted to be seen together in New York as symbols of reconciliation.  Charles Frazier said in an interview with the Raleigh News & Observer, “She would have days when she would say something incredibly retrograde, and then she would say something so positive and progressive. She was struggling with what had become of her life, being on the wrong side of history…It’s only the greatest heroes in history, who are able to totally rise above the values of their culture.  She certainly wasn’t. But she was trying.”

As always, the discussion was stimulating and interesting.  Several members increased their ratings based on the discussion.  Overall, members felt like they had to work too hard to enjoy the novel.  One member thought it would have been helpful to have a timeline in the front of the book—this would assist the reader in tracking the story of Varina.  Most members really enjoyed the fugitive story section (the escape of Varina and her children from Richmond).  This story was an educational technique to introduce readers to the tumultuous and chaotic South right after the fall of Richmond.

All group members were impressed with the talented writing of Charles Frazier.  They found his prose lyrical and moving.  They enjoyed his descriptive writing.  Some members thought his writing style was exquisite, but felt the novel was too lengthy and jumped around too much.  So, while sentences were beautifully constructed; it was too hard to follow.

The group spent a fair amount of time discussing the narrative choices of Charles Frazier.  Most members found the narrative confusing and disjointed.  They did not like the way he wrote the novel.  They especially disliked the lack of quotation marks and the stream of consciousness-like writing and the memory flashbacks.  Two members were not bothered by the punctuation.  The facilitator has a special fondness for the “hyphen,” so she loved the punctuation choice.  To her, the use of the hyphens felt like the waxing and waning of memories—they are random and they come and go—they are not linear or formal.

Surprisingly, the members who gave the novel low marks were still interested in pursuing more information about Varina Davis.  So, the author did a good job in sparking interest in the story of a relatively unknown woman. One member stated that she considers a historical novel a worthy read if the novel causes her to want to learn more about the subject matter or the characters presented.

The facilitator really connected with the writing of Charles Frazier.  She read the novel in four sittings and thought that the back and forth nature of memories felt just like the way people remember events.  Memories are not linear but they move and shift. The facilitator thought that any author that can fully connect a reader with characters from the past is worth their weight in gold.

Discussion Highlights:

  • We discussed Varina Howell’s upbringing and her parents. We discussed the expectations and the choices women had in the 1800’s.
  • We discussed Varina’s marriage with Jefferson Davis. We talked about their differing personalities and how this affected their marriage. We discussed Varina’s strength of character to insist on in being named in her husband’s will.
  • The novel Varina has been compared to Gone With the Wind. The group talked about how the novels are similar.  The group thought that Frazier depicted The Fall of Richmond much like Mitchell depicted The Burning of Atlanta. In some ways, Varina is like Scarlett — they both are strong woman and survivors.  They both naively dream about their debutante past—without realizing this structure was built on slavery. We discussed Varina’s hopes and dreams and contrasted this with the life that was forced upon her — similar to Scarlett’s trajectory.
  • We discussed Varina’s view of slavery as depicted by Charles Frazier and we discussed how this view evolved over the course of the novel. In an interview, Frazier talks about why he was intrigued with Varina Davis—she was born in the South and lived with slavery all around; as she lived into old age she seemed to wrestle with her past and her complicity and this is definitely addressed in the novel.
  • The groups spent a good deal of time talking about Varina’s complicity and views. From p. 101 – “Varina has never made any claim of personal high ground. She grew up where and when she did. From earliest memory, owning other people was a given. But she began feeling the strangeness of it about nine or ten—not wrongness or the sin of it, but the strangeness only.”
  • We contrasted the above view with another passage from the novel on p. 39, “Being on the wrong side of history carries consequences. Varina lives that truth every day. If you’ve done terrible things, lived a terribly way, profited from pain in the face of history’s power to judge, then guilt and loss accrue.”  The group discussed Varina’s version of the truth and whether or not her understanding/perception of it has changed over the years.
  • Early in the novel on p. 6, Varina states, “If you haven’t noticed, we’re a furious nation, and war drums beat in our chest. Our leaders proclaim better than they negotiate. The only bright spot is, the right side won.” In light of this quote, the group discussed what they thought Varina would think about today’s removal of the South’s many Civil War statues, including her husband’s.
  • Charles Frazier uses an interesting device to tell Varina’s story; he uses a real life black child, Jimmie Limber, as a character. Jimmie Limber lived with the Davises for several years during the Civil War. When the novel opens we meet Varina Davis in 1906 in Saratoga Springs.  Varina is living at The Retreat (a rehabilitation facility).  She is in the midst of trying to overcome her opium addiction and while there James Blake (Jimmie Limber) comes to find out about his past.  It is a this time, readers are introduced to the adult Jimmie Limber who is a fictional character that Charles Frazier has created to move Varina’s story forward while addressing and gently critiquing her past.  James keeps Varina’s recollections moored in others’ reality.  So, readers are introduced to an unreliable narrator—an older woman with a drug problem.  James Blake interviews Varina over the course of seven Sundays and readers must trace the back and forth nature of memories and recollections.  In light of how the narrative is written, we discussed how Varina and James’ memories reveal their different experiences.  We discussed what insights we gained from each of the characters’ revelations.
  • The novel’s timeline shifts frequently. We discussed whether or not we found this confusing or distracting.  We discussed how this shift reveals the fractured nature of memories, as well as the way the past bleed into the present.

Resources:

https://charlesfrazier.com/

Charles Frazier was interviewed at Appel Salon (Toronto Public Library)
on November 7, 2018 (If interested, this interview can be accessed on YouTube).

For books and movie in our collection by Charles Frazier, please click here.

For a nonfiction title recommended by Charles Frazier, check out:

Jacket

Read-a-Likes:

Varina

new DVDs, reader's advisory

New DVDs – February 2019

The following films have been added to our collection during the month of February.
MPAA ratings follow each title in parentheses, with (NR) denoting the film is not rated.  If a language other than English follows the film title, the film will be in that language with optional English subtitles.

At Eternity’s Gate (PG-13)
Black ’47 (R)
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
Boundaries (R)
Boy Erased (R)
The Cloverfield Paradox (PG-13)
Colette (R)
The Front Runner (R)
Getting Grace (PG-13)
The Girl in the Spider’s Web (R)
Goldstone (R)
The Happy Prince (R)
The Hunter Killer (R)
Indivisible (PG-13)
Little Women (2018)(PG-13)
Lost Child (NR)
My Dinner with Hervé (TV-MA)
Overlord (R)
The Paper Store (NR)
The Predator (2018)(R)
A Private War (R)
Shoplifters (Japanese)(R)
The Sisters Brothers (R)
A Star is Born (2018)(R)
Widows (R)

Updated 2/27/19

new DVDs, reader's advisory

New DVDs – January 2019

The following films have been added to our collection during the month of January.
MPAA ratings follow each title in parentheses, with (NR) denoting the film is not rated.  If a language other than English follows the film title, the film will be in that language with optional English subtitles.

Along with the Gods: The Last 49 Days (Korean)(NR)
AXL (PG)
Bad Times at the El Royale (R)
Beyond the Clouds (Hindi)(NR)
BlacKkKlansman (R)
First Man (PG-13)
Halloween (2018)(R)
The Hate U Give (PG-13)
Hell Fest (R)
The Hunter Killer (R)
Johnny English Strikes Again (PG)
mid90s (R)
Monsters and Men (R)
Night School (PG-13)
The Nun (R)
The Old Man & the Gun (PG-13)
One Hundred Two Not Out (Hindi)(PG)
Peppermint (R)
A Simple Favor (R)
Three Identical Strangers (PG-13)
Time Freak (PG-13)
Venom (PG-13)
What They Had (R)
White Boy Rick (R)
The Wife (R)

Updated 1/30/18

Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break – December 2018

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Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break Book Discussion Groups on
Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

Ratings:
The Books and Bagels Book Discussion group members rated the book between a 3.5 and 5.0 with one member giving the book a 2.5. The average of the ratings was 3.79.

The Morning Book Break Book Discussion group rated the book between a 3.0 and 5.0. The average of the ratings was 4.33.

Review:
The novel was 502 pages long, so sadly during the holiday season not all members were able to finish the novel.  Some members thought that the book demanded a lot of time and that there were too many characters and the book was too long. The facilitator promised a shorter book for the 2019-2020 book club season.

Many members enjoyed the cozy British mystery compared to the contemporary mystery.  Members found that the cozy British mystery reminded them of Agatha Christie and Sherlock Holmes novels.  Members definitely would recommend this novel to people who enjoy cozy mysteries written in the vein of Christie.  One member, who has read all of Christie’s books, thought Horowitz followed the pattern and pitch of Christie, but Magpie Murders was his own style—she found this very intriguing. One member felt the book in a way offered a tutorial on murder mysteries.

Overall, members who were able to read the novel in bigger chunks seemed to be more satisfied with novel.  Members found the book very cleverly written and that it generated good discussion even for members who do not read mysteries.  On the whole, members were satisfied with the ending and no one was able to solve the mystery in its entirety.

Two members had read the book previously as it received high recommendations from Book Pages.  These members thought the book was a cut above and very cerebral.  They thought the book accurately portrayed the English community and that the descriptions of the characters were vivid.  One member thought about whether or not the book could have been published as two books.  The members resolved her own inquiry, by stating that she believed for the novel to work it need to be published as two mysteries in one book.

Several members were frustrated that Horowitz led them so far afield and indeed, he pulled scenarios out of the bag to throw readers off the track.  Nevertheless, Horowitz attempts to calm the reader’s frustration by inserting statements in the novel to encourage the reader to continue.  On p. 145 (cozy mystery) Atticus Pund wrote in his masterwork, The Landscape of Criminal Investigation: “One can think of the truth as eine vertiefung—a sort of deep valley which may not be visible from a distance but which will come upon you quite suddenly.  There are many ways to arrive there. A line of questioning that turns out to be irrelevant still has the power to bring you nearer to your goal.  There are no wasted journeys in the detection a crime.”

Finally, several members who are not fans of mysteries really enjoyed the novel.  They enjoyed trying to solve the puzzles and felt this was a great brain exercise.

Discussion Highlights:

  • In Magpie Murders, Anthony Horowitz gives occasional commentary comparing literary fiction and popular fiction and the artist’s endeavor in a commercial world. The facilitator posed some general questions regarding these topics. The facilitator created these questions to cover the overall questions about why mysteries are so successful in the publishing world.
  • Using characters, Anthony Horowitz talks about the public’s need for mysteries. He speaks to the obsession the public has for murder mysteries.

The group was asked to comment on these sections of the book:

p. 70 – Susan Ryeland, editor of Cloverleaf books
“…It’s strange when you think about it. There are hundreds and hundreds of murders in books and television. It would be hard for narrative fiction to survive without them.  And yet there are almost none in real life…Why is it that we have such a need for murder mystery and what is it that attracts us—the crime or the solution?  Do we have some primal need of bloodshed because our own lives are so safe, so comfortable?”

p. 159 Detective Inspector Richard Locke
“All these murders on TV…Every night…People have some sort of fixation. And what really annoys me is that it’s nothing like the truth…There are only three motives. Sex, anger and money…And you know how we catch them? We don’t ask them clever questions and work out that they don’t have an alibi, that they weren’t actually where they were meant to be. We catch them on CCTV.  Half the time, they leave their DNA all over the crime scene.  Or they confess. Maybe one day you should publish the truth although I’m telling you, nobody would want to read it.”

The facilitator further responded from the book.  On pages 183-184, Susan Ryeland speaks to the power of mysteries.

The group was asked to offer commentary about this statement from the book:

“In a world of full of uncertainties, is it not inherently satisfying to come to the last page with every i dotted and every t crossed?  …We are surrounded by tensions and ambiguities, which we spend half our life trying to resolve, and we’ll probably be on our own deathbed when we reach that moment when everything makes sense.  Just about every whodunnit provides that pleasure.  It is the reason for their existence.”

The facilitator addressed the comments made in Magpie Murders about the value of mysteries.

Andreas, Ancient Greek scholar, debates Susan regarding the literary value of mysteries on pp. 164-165.

Andreas said, “’I read them because you worked on them and obviously I cared about       you.  But I thought they were crap.’I was shocked.  I didn’t know what to say.

‘They made a lot of money.’

‘Cigarettes make a lot of money.  Toilet paper makes a lot of money.  It doesn’t mean            they’re worth anything.’

‘You can’t say that.’

‘Why not? Alan Conway was laughing at you, Susan.  He was laughing at everyone.  I           know about writing. I teach Homer…He knew what those books were—and he knew        when he was putting them together.  They’re badly written trash!’

‘I don’t agree.  They’re very well written.  Millions of people enjoyed them.’

‘They’re worth nothing! Eighty thousand words to prove that they butler did it?’

‘You’re just being snobbish.’

‘And you’re defending something that you always knew had no value at all.’”

Then the facilitator asked the group whether mysteries have any lasting value to our society.

Melissa Conway, Alan’s ex-wife talks to Susan about her role in getting Alan to write detective fiction.  Melissa loved Alan’s literary work, but it wasn’t getting published.  She convinced Alan to write mysteries because he always had a fascination with tricks and trompe l’oeils.  Melissa helped him to write his first mystery, Atticus Pund Investigates and as his mysteries became publishing sensations, Alan changed and was no longer fulfilled.  Alan hated his main character, the noble, Atticus Pund.  Melissa states on page 198, “Of course, it wasn’t as good as his other work.  It was lighter and completely pointless, but I thought it was beautifully written…”

The facilitator asked the group if they read mysteries or watch mysteries, if so, why do they enjoy about them.

  • The group discussed clues that were hidden in plain sight and how skillful Horowitz was in burying those clues.
  • The group discussed at length the many red-herrings Horowitz used to lead the reader astray.
  • We discussed how the author ratcheted up the suspense.
  • We discussed at what point in the book the members began to unravel the mystery.
  • Finally, we discussed the skill necessary to write this novel. We compared and contrasted the Golden Age mystery set in the 1950’s with the Contemporary mystery.  We compared the language, tone, style, pace, and typeface used. We discussed the use of character counterparts in each novel.  We discussed the significance of the anagram.  Also, members stated they would like to know the meaning behind the cover of Magpie Murders.

Resources:

Anthony Horowitz, the author, cleverly uses two different typefaces to assist the reader in distinguishing between the two mysteries. The Cozy Mystery pages are numbered at the bottom of each page and the Contemporary Mystery pages are numbered at the top of each page.

1) Cozy Mystery set in 1950’s (pp. 3-212 and near very end of entire book—Chapter entitled, A Secret Never to be Told (pp. 217-241))

2) Contemporary Mystery—very beginning of book (pp.1-4) continues in middle of book (pp. 5-232) and epilogue entitled, Agios Nikolaos, Crete (pp. 233-236)

(pages correspond to Regular Type Hardcover copy)

Characters in Cozy Mystery:

Sir Magnus Pye: Lord of Pye Hall
Lady Frances Pye: Magnus’s wife
Jack Dartford: Lady Frances Pye’s lover
Frederick (Freddy) Pye: Magnus and Frances’ son
Clarissa Pye: spinster sister of Magnus and local schoolteacher
Dr. Redwing: Local Doctor
Arthur: Artist husband of Dr. Redwing
Dr. Edgar Rennard: Dr. Redwing’s father who has dementia
Mary Blakiston: housekeeper at Pye Hall
Matthew Blakiston: Mary’s estranged husband
Tom Blakiston: one of Mary and Matthew’s sons
Robert Blakiston: one of Mary and Matthew’s sons
Joy Sanderling: Robert’s fiancé
Neville Brent: groundskeeper at Pye Hall
Diana Weaver: local cleaning lady
Jeffrey Weaver: elderly gravedigger
Rev. Robert Osborne: local vicar
Henrietta Osborne: Vicar’s wife
Johnny and Gemma Whitehead: owners of local antique shop
Arthur Reeve: recently burglarized and medal collection missing
Detective Inspector Raymond Chubb: local policeman
Atticus Pund: Poirot-like character for this mystery
James Fraser: Atticus’s sidekick

Characters in Contemporary Murder Mystery (counterparts from Cozy mystery in parentheses):

Susan Ryeland (Atticus Pund): editor, Cloverleaf books
Andreas Pataks: Susan’s professor boyfriend
Charles Clover (Robert Blakiston): CEO and founder of Cloverleaf books
Jemina Humphries: Charles Clover’s secretary
Alan Conway (Sir Magnus Pye): author of Magpie Murders
Sajid Khan and wife: Alan’s lawyer and friend
Rev. Tom Robeson (Rev. Robin Osborne): local vicar
Mark Redmond (Matthew Blakiston): TV and Film producer of Red Herring Productions/possible developing The Atticus Adventures
John White (Johnny Whitehead): hedgefund manager and Alan’s neighbor
Claire Jenkins (Clarissa Pye): Alan’s sister
James Taylor (James Fraser): Alan’s boyfriend
Melissa Conway (Lady Frances Pye): Alan’s ex-wife
Frederick/Freddy Conway (Frederick/Freddy Pye): Alan and Melissa’s son
Detective Superintendent Richard Locke (Detective Inspector Raymond Chubb): detective who helped Melissa and Alan with research for mystery novels

https://www.anthonyhorowitz.com/

 

Read-a-Likes:

Magpie Murders

Anthony Horowitz is well known for creating and writing Foyle’s War and his wife,
Jane Green, is the producer.
Horowitz has also written many screenplays for Midsomer Murders.

For books and DVDs in our collection by Anthony Horowitz, please click here.

Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Morning Book Break and Books and Bagels – November 2018

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Morning Book Break and Books and Bagels Book Discussion Groups on
Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Ratings:
The Books and Bagels Book Discussion group members rated the book between a 3.5 and 4.0 with one member giving the book a 2.75. The average of the ratings was 3.75.

The Morning Book Break Book Discussion group rated the book between a 1.0 and 4.0. The average of the ratings was 2.53.

Review:
As always, the discussion was stimulating and interesting.  Several members increased their ratings based on the discussion.  The members see value in book discussions as they play a role in helping the individual see a variety of viewpoints that they would not have discovered during their individual reading.  This was definitely the case during this discussion.

The evaluation of the novel revolved around two camps. One group of members really disliked the novel.  They got lost with the shifting points of view.  Overall, members found the book depressing and would not recommend it to others.  However, those that disliked the story kept reading because they wanted to find out what happened to Lydia. Some members found the book a chore to read, but they loved the discussion.

Another group of members were impressed with the talented writing of Celeste Ng.  They were surprised that this was a debut novel as her prose is both mature and moving. The members found the family dysfunction disturbing, but compelling and haunting.  The material was complex and the group felt empathy for the entire family and yet, they found the mother and family completely selfish and self-absorbed.

The facilitator mentioned that she enjoys human behavior and patterns that exists in human interactions.  She enjoys trying to figure out the ways people are misunderstood.  She likes to explore why miscommunications often happen.  She thought the author superbly explored this main dynamic.

Discussion Highlights:

  • The groups discussed the sibling relationships within the story.  We discussed why Lydia is the favorite child of Marilyn and James, her parents.  Marilyn pressures Lydia to study hard to obtain the goal of becoming a doctor and James pressures Lydia to be social and popular.  We discussed the reasons why her parents apply this pressure and how this attention affects her.  We discussed how this attention affects her siblings Nathan and Hannah, and how they are often overlooked.
  • We discussed how James and Marilyn’s childhoods informed their parenting style.  James struggled with his identity throughout his life and this affected his relationship with his family.  We talked about the ways James could have coped with his identity crisis.  We talked about the influence parents can have on their children.  We discussed communication patterns in this family and how improvements in communication can improve navigation for a new generation of young people.
  • We discussed what we wished the characters would have shared with each other and how these interactions could have changed the outcome of the novel.
  • On pp. 89-93 James watches as his son Nathan is teased at the pool.  We discussed the “Marco Polo” pool scene and talked about how we felt about James’s reaction.  We discussed how it feels to be an outsider and how parents’ can help children cope.
  • The book is set in Ohio in 1977, so it touches upon the role of stay-at-home mothers and the notion that that motherhood and keeping a home was more satisfying that and important than having a career.  We talked about how the story might have been different if it was set in present day Ohio.  We discussed whether or not women today can have it all—meaning both children and careers.
  • We discussed the role of Jack—a minor character in the story.
  • We discussed the shifts in points of view and we discussed the structure of the novel.
  • (Spoiler Alert) We discussed what the possible outcomes would be for each member of the family if Lydia had reached the dock.
  • We talked about the title and to whom the “I” and “you” refer.

Resources:

https://www.celesteng.com/about/

Worth watching in its entirety, Celeste Ng is a dynamic speaker.

For books in our collection by Celeste Ng, please click here.

For readers interested in current authors who use omniscient narrator technique, Celeste Ng highly recommends:

Jacket (6)

Jacket (7)

Jacket (8)

Read-a-Likes:

Everything I Never Told You

new DVDs, reader's advisory

New DVDs – December 2018

The following films have been added to our collection during the month of December.
MPAA ratings follow each title in parentheses, with (NR) denoting the film is not rated.  If a language other than English follows the film title, the film will be in that language with optional English subtitles.

Beautifully Broken (PG-13)
A Bramble House Christmas (NR)
Christmas at Holly Lodge (TV-G)
Christmas Next Door (TV-G)
Christmas on the Coast (TV-G)
Christmas with Holly (NR)
Crazy Rich Asians (PG-13)
Dark Crimes (R)
Dashing Through the Snow (NR)
Dog Days (PG)
A Dog Named Christmas (TV-PG)
Eighth Grade (R)
Engaging Father Christmas (TV-G)
The Equalizer 2 (R)
Escape Plan 2: Hades (R)
Final Score (R)
God Bless the Broken Road (PG)
Gotti (R)
The Happytime Murders (R)
I Think We’re Alone Now (R)
Kin (PG-13)
The Little Stranger (R)
Maggie’s Christmas Miracle (TV-G)
Mara (R)
Mission Impossible: Fallout (PG-13)
Operation Finale (PG-13)
Puzzle (R)
Searching (PG-13)
Siberia (R)
Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
Unbroken: Path to Redemption (PG-13)
A Very Merry Toy Store/Four Christmases and a Wedding (double pack, both TV-PG)
Wrapped Up in Christmas/Snowed-Inn Christmas (double pack, both TV-PG)

Updated 12/29/18

Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break – October 2018

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Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break Book Discussion Groups on
Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran

Ratings:
The Books and Bagels Book Discussion group members rated the book between a 3.5 and 4.5 with one member giving the book a 3.0 and another member rating the book at 5.0. The average of the ratings was 4.03.

The Morning Book Break Book Discussion group rated the book between a 3.0 and 4.0, with one member giving the book a 2.0 and one member giving the book a 5.0. The average of the ratings was 3.69.

Several members gave the book a higher rating because the discussion was so poignant.

Review:
Overall members enjoyed this read and learned a lot about the immigrant experience. Members were conflicted about parts of the book. Many members had a hard time getting into the book.  Some members liked the first half better and some members liked the second half better. Some members liked the way the book ended and some members strongly disliked the way the book ended.  Overall, members were thankful that the story was not a Hollywood ending. Based on September’s book club read (a Hollywood ending), one member did not want to read the last 10 or so pages, she was worried that the author was going to wrap-up the book and all the characters into a nice neat little package—so, finally, when the member read the end, she was happily surprised that it was not a tidy ending.  The ending is complex and rang true to real life, in that, issues and people are multi-faceted without simple solutions. Most members agreed with this member’s assessment.

Some members thought the book was well-written and others thought the book needed editing.  One member thought that maybe the author had fallen in love with the sound of her own voice.  Although, members thought the author did a good job of developing sympathetic characters; the book was still too long.

Members appreciated the research the author did to bring readers the story.  Members enjoyed learning about both cultures. Members thought this was a timely book and they enjoyed exploring multiple sides to an issue.

Discussion Highlights:

  • The groups discussed how the novel explores motherhood from the main character’s perspectives and from minor character’s perspectives.  Although, the title is Lucky Boy, the author states, “This story, this fight for a boy—it wasn’t about the boy.  It was about his mothers.” The author created sympathy for both Kavya and Soli, by spending so much time developing their characters.  We discussed the key differences between Soli’s and Kavya’s approach to motherhood. We discussed which woman we most related to.
  • Soli travels to America riding on La Bestia, while Kavya’s family arrived by more traditional means.  So, we discussed the novel’s portrayal of privileged versus unprivileged immigration. We briefly discussed Soli’s treatment in immigrant detention.
  • When Rishi is asked if he wants a child, he thinks “Children had seemed like a project planted permanently in the future.  A certainty about which he never thought he’d be asked. Had anyone asked his own father if he’d wanted a baby?” We discussed how the novel portrays fatherhood and whether it is different than motherhood.
  • The group discussed how the novel portrays class stratification.  We also talked about whether the classic idea of the American dream is still attainable.
  • The story was set on the fictional Weebies campus in Silicon Valley and we discussed how the setting shaped the novel.
  • The facilitator asked the group, how they felt about the ending and whether, or not, they were surprised.  (Spoiler alert) We talked about Kavya’s decision to fight to keep Iggy. We talked about whether or not Soli should have made a different choice.
  • We discussed the title and if, indeed, Ignacio was a lucky boy.

Resources:
Each year the clubs read the Suburban Mosaic selection.  The Suburban Mosaic is a Community Reading Program for suburban communities in Cook and Lake County with the mission of fostering cultural understanding through literature.
The participating organizations are: Des Plaines Public Library, Elk Grove Village Public Library, Lincolnwood Public Library, Mount Prospect Public Library, Palatine Public Library, Prospect Heights Public Library, Rolling Meadows Public Library, Schaumburg Twp. District Library, School Districts 15, 23, 25, 26, 54, 57, and 63, District 214 Community Education, Harper College, National-Louis University, and
the Daily Herald Newspaper.

Lucky Boy
was the adult selection for 2017-2018.

For further information, please see flyer below:

suburban-mosaic-2017-june21-page-001

suburban-mosaic-2017-june21-page-002

Read-a-Likes:

Lucky Boy