RA Programs

Summer Reading has Begun!

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Our annual Summer Reading Program began on Monday, June 12th.  Come on in and sign up for our mystery themed extravaganza!

For Adults, each book read gives you an entry to win prize packs, candy, small themed gifts, and other neat prizes!  There are also quizzes that can be filled out for a chance to win end-of-summer gift cards to local restaurants and online stores.  When you sign up, you’ll receive a goody bag with the quizzes, a booklist, and other small favors to get you started.  In the goody bag is also a card for this blog!  Become a blog subscriber via email and be entered to win a special “Inspector Mallard” prize pack!

For Teens, each book read, movie watched, or CD listened to counts toward your chances to win the prizes listed above!  You also have a quiz in your goody bag that can be filled out for a chance to win end-of-summer gift cards to places like Gamestop, iTunes, and local restaurants.

While construction is still going on, please stop by the Reader’s Advisory desk in the East Wing to sign up and receive your goody bag and free first prize entry slip!

Any Questions?  Please call the library @ 847.259.6050 and ask for Reader’s Advisory, or comment on any of our blog posts!

Displays

Let’s Plan a Beach Party Weekend!

Discover the many ways you can benefit from the Rolling Meadows Library collection with our Let’s Plan a Weekend displays at the Welcome Desk!

We are having small, themed raffles in conjunction with these displays that patrons can enter to win!   Each display also includes bookmarks to take home on how to create your own unique, themed experiences with library materials, which are also on display.  Raffle winners do need to have a Rolling Meadows library card, but everyone can check out the materials or take home a bookmark!

The display which has just ended was “Let’s Plan a Chillin’ & Grillin’ Weekend!”  Patrons entered to win a prize pack of books, movies, music, and other materials related to relaxing outside and cooking on the grill, just in time for Memorial Day! Our winner for this prize pack was Tina K., out of a total of 64 entries.

Questions?  Call the library @ 847.259.6050 or stop by the Welcome Desk!

5-30 Beach Party

Book Club

The After Party – Books & Bagels and Morning Book Break – May 2017

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Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break Book Discussions on
Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande

Rating: In Books and Bagels, the book received ratings between 4.0 and 5.0+. The average of the ratings was 4.43. Three members gave the book a 5+.  This book received an unusually high rating as compared to past books selected for club.

In Morning Book Break, the book received ratings between a 0 and 5.0+.  The average of the ratings was 4.72. This was also an unusually high rating.

Review: 

Morning Book Break: Members found the book very informative, but the information presented was depressing. Most members would rather not focus on end-of-life issues and most members could only digest the book in small chunks. In spite of this fact, members found the book to be exceptionally well-written and inspiring.  Several members thought it should be a book everyone in the medical profession should read. One member thought this selection was the most valuable read since she has been attending book club.  Members would definitely encourage others to read the book. Members have noticed that Atul Gawande has been on several network news shows and members are glad to be informed about current topics/events.

Books and Bagels: Members overwhelming would and have recommended this book to others. Many members are now going to purchase this book to give to loved ones and also, to give to several doctors. Members believe this is a foundational book, which should be read by every medical professional prior to graduation. Members found the book to be a necessary, important read. One member said, “Definitely, have a tissue box ready if you decide to read.”  Discussion centered on what worked and didn’t work in end life experiences. Members spent time sharing personal preparations. One member pointed out that Atul Gawande is listed in Fortune’s May 1, 2017 issue on p. 46 in the article 34 Leaders Who Are Changing Health Care. Members are excited to read about current information and they feel up-to-date.

Discussion Highlights:

  • Conversation about the personal narratives and anecdotal stories shared by the author
  • Members found the stories to be fruitful and provided helpful insights apart from the facts, figures, and statistics
  • Complexities of medical education and insufficiencies regarding medical training for death, grief, and end-of-life decisions
  • Effectiveness of Doctor Styles: Paternalistic, Informative, and Interpretive
  • Evolution of nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and hospice and what matters most in the end
  • Striking a balance between hope and reality
  • Dr. Gawande’s personal story of his father’s terminal illness
  • Healthcare costs and potential remedies/medical funding/quality-of-life issues/death with dignity
  • How traditions/spirituality influence the concept of being mortal
  • Shared tips/strategies for effectively dealing with mortality—what is involved in a “good death”
  • Aging in the US and abroad
  • Tension between safety and independent living/joyful existence
  • Combating the “Three Plagues of Nursing Home Existence: Boredom, Loneliness, and Helplessness”

Resources:

For other books by Atul Gawande in our collection, please click here.

We also own the Frontline DVD Being Mortal; the film explores the interactions between doctors and patients approaching the end of life.

Jacket (5)

Atul Gawande recommends doctors begin to talk about the inevitability of death with terminally ill patients and he recommends a good place to start is with the use of the “Serious Illness Conversation Guide.” He wrote the guide at the following link to find out what terminally ill patients understand about their condition and what their goals are as the end nears.

http://www.talkaboutwhatmatters.org/documents/Providers/Serious-Illness-Guide.pdf

Read-a-Likes:

Being Mortal

Book Club

After Dinner Mints – The Dish on Just Desserts – April 2017

after-dinner-mints

Just Desserts Discussion Group talks about
Our Souls at Night
by Kent Haruf

This month, our book club selection was Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf.

Kent Haruf (rhymes with sheriff) was an American novelist, who wrote six books. All six books were set in the fictional town of Holt, Colorado. Kent earned a BA from Nebraska Wesleyan University and an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa.

His name may be familiar from his Plainsong series. First published was Plainsong, followed by Eventide, with Benediction finishing the trilogy. All three novels became bestsellers.

Sadly, on November 30, 2014, at the age of 71, Kent Haruf died at home from interstitial lung disease. Our Souls at Night, his final work was published posthumously in 2015. His wife, Cathy, and his editor, Gary Fisketjon, were instrumental in getting the novel ready for publication.

Addie Moore visited her neighbor, Louis Waters, with the following proposition; please come to my house to sleep with me at night. Not sex, just companionship at night. Both neighbors had been widowed and they were in their seventies. They found that nights were the loneliest part of the day for them. They would fall asleep telling each other their life stories.

This act of bravery on Addie’s part began a sweet and tender friendship for both of them. Their children and grandchild did not live close. The two friends started sharing meals, chores, and travel.

Before he passed, Kent told his wife that he was going to write a book about them. He sure did. Our group just loved this touching story. Mr. Haruf’s novel really is a beautiful gift to us all!

Netflix will be releasing the film version in late 2017, starring Robert Redford and Jane Fonda.

Our Souls at Night

Displays

Let’s Plan a “Honey Do” Weekend!

Discover the many ways you can benefit from the Rolling Meadows Library collection with our Let’s Plan a Weekend displays at the Welcome Desk!

We are having small, themed raffles in conjunction with these displays that patrons can enter to win!   Each display also includes bookmarks to take home on how to create your own unique, themed experiences with library materials, which are also on display.  Raffle winners do need to have a Rolling Meadows library card, but everyone can check out the materials or take home a bookmark!

The display which has just ended was “Let’s Plan a Kitschy Kraft Klatch Weekend!”  Patrons entered to win a prize pack with books and materials on crafting and creating. Our winner for this prize pack was Betty A., out of a total of 70 entries.

Questions?  Call the library @ 847.259.6050 or stop by the Welcome Desk!

4-17 Honey Do

Book Club

The After Party – Morning Book Break – April 2017

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Morning Book Break Discussion on The Marriage of Opposites by Alice Hoffman

Rating: The Marriage of Opposites received ratings between 4.0 and 5.0, with an overall average rating of 4.56.  

Review: The Marriage of Opposites received high marks from all book club members.  Members enjoy generational historical fiction with strong women characters and this novel delivered in these aspects.  We enjoyed a fascinating discussion about the life and times of the father of Impressionism, Camille Pissarro.

Discussion Highlights:

  • Several members appreciated the structure of the novel including the way the chapters were entitled.  This was useful in tracking both the timeline and the vast amount of characters.
  • (Spoiler alert!) Several members were haunted by Lydia’s abduction.  Members were horrified to learn it would be twenty years before she saw her mother again.
  • All members were transfixed by Alice Hoffman’s descriptive language which transported them to the sights, smells, and sounds of St. Thomas and Paris circa the 1800’s. Members loved the vibrant, accurate descriptions of St. Thomas and Paris.  Members who have traveled to these locations felt the author captured them exquisitely.  One member said she literally could feel the humidity of the island.  Members thought the writing in The Marriage of Opposites was the work of a gifted, talent artist—one who could write skillfully about another artist.  Hoffman definitely understands the emotions conveyed on a canvas.  
  • Several members stated that the novel was a quick read and they were unable to put it down. Many chores and necessary tasks at home were left undone!
  • Members enjoyed the compelling characters with such interesting lives.
  • Sadly, members wished we had more time to discuss some of the motifs and magical realism presented in the novel, especially the turtle-girl/woman.

Resources:

The members viewed several of Pissarro’s paintings and then they were asked the following question:

Did any of Pissarro’s paintings that remind you of scenes in the novel?
How does
The Marriage of Opposites convey Pissarro’s style?

You can view some of Pissarro’s paintings by clicking here.

Read-a-Likes:

The Marriage of Opposites

Book Club

The After Party – Books and Bagels – April 2017

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Books and Bagels Book Discussion on The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt

Rating: The Sisters Brothers received ratings between 1.0 and 5.0 with an average rating of 3.58.

Review: The reviews were mixed; members either really enjoyed the novel or really detested the novel.

Discussion Highlights:

  • Many members found the novel highly entertaining.  Members found the novel a unique, clever episodic Western.
  • Members discussed whether or not the story was successful as a loosely based picaresque novel.
  • Members appreciated deWitt’s dark humor and members were mystified by how they found themselves laughing at very grisly elements. There was much discussion about the techniques used by deWitt to pull off this feat.  It shows his true talent as an author and members agreed that the novel was worthy of The Man Booker Prize.
  • Members adored the witty banter between the two brothers and the well-developed brother relationship.
  • Members liked watching Eli, the younger brother, develop as an independent person over the course of the novel.
  • Members found the use of first person to be refreshing and felt the structure utilized served the novel well.
  • Members enjoyed the inconspicuous social commentary exhibited throughout the book.
  • Several members appreciated the bare-bones acknowledgements at the end of the book and they wish more authors would employ this technique.
  • Members really appreciated the facilitator presentation about the author and felt they better understood Patrick deWitt and his style.
  • Members learned that Patrick deWitt is a huge fan of Roald Dahl.  One member enjoys reading Dahl and thought deWitt and Dahl have a similar style as both are highly imaginative, dark yarn spinners.
  • Members enjoyed the use of Intermissions, but were perplexed over the Weeping Man, the Old Witch, and the Poisonous Little Girl.  The facilitator provided author insight into these characters.  Overall, the members enjoyed these seemingly unrelated vignettes.
  • One member enjoyed The Sisters Brothers (deWitt’s second novel) so much, that she decided to read deWitt’s Undermajordomo Minor (deWitt’s third novel).  She recommends this unusual novel, but thought The Sisters Brothers was overall a better novel.

Resources:


Patrick deWitt discusses his novel with Jared Bland at the Toronto Public Library.  deWitt discusses improving his craft, what writers should read, research, narrative voice choice, symbolism, and ending choice.

Read-a-Likes:

The Sisters Brothers

Book Club

After Dinner Mints – The Dish on Just Desserts – March 2017

after-dinner-mints

Just Desserts Discussion Group talks about
The Phantom of the Opera
by Gaston Leroux

This month, our group read Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Louis Alfred Leroux. Many of our members have seen various productions of the musical, but none of us had read the book before.

Gaston Leroux was born in Paris in 1868. He studied law in school.  After school, Gaston started writing as a court reporter, theater critic, and international correspondent. He covered the 1905 Russian Revolution.

In 1907, Leroux began writing fiction. In 1908, he wrote The Mystery of the Yellow Room. In 1911, Leroux wrote The Phantom of the Opera.   It was not well received until the 1925 film with Lon Chaney hit the movie screen. There was also a huge revival when Andrew Lloyd Webber turned it into the longest running musical of all time! Leroux’s contribution to French detective fiction is considered a parallel to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s in the U.K. and Edgar Allan Poe’s in the U.S. He was made a Chevalier de la Legion d’honneur in 1909.  Leroux died in 1927 in Nice.

We shared a great discussion about the author, the novel, and the former Paris Opera House. In 1858, Emperor Napoleon III of France ordered a new opera house be built in Paris that would be the envy of the world. Over 700 architects competed for the position of Chief architect. Charles Garnier was chosen for the job. The building was built on three acres with seven roads like spokes of a wheel coming out from it.  The new opera house had seventeen floors with eighty dressing rooms.  It opened to the public in 1875.

This beautifully written gothic novel explores light versus darkness, love versus obsession and unrequited love. We all agreed that the theater is a very romantic setting for our story. We also talked about the importance of masks to the story.

All in all, a magical evening with French pastries and an awesome discussion!

The Phantom of the Opera

Book Club, RA Programs

The After Party – Books and Bagels – Feb. 2017

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Books and Bagels Discussion on Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg

Rating: Did You Ever Have A Family received ratings between 2.5 and 5.0 with an average rating of 3.73.

Review: We appreciated another excellent discussion with most members either praising the novel or disliking the novel.  One member noted that this is the case for many authors and genres at the library—people definitely enjoy different novels.  She further noted that the discussion is always exciting when there is disagreement. Also, she complimented the array of selections presented to the book club.

Did You Ever Have A Family is Bill Clegg’s debut fiction novel. Members had not previously read either of his memoirs. All members were moved by minor character Cissy’s role in the lives of several main characters.  Cissy states, “Rough as life can be, I know in my bones we are supposed to stick around and play our part…..Someone down the line might need to know you got through it. Or maybe someone you won’t see coming will need you…And it might be you never know the part you played, what it meant to someone to watch you make your way each day.” p. 289 (paperback)

Discussion Highlights:

  • The members who gave the novel high marks cited the following reasons:
    • Fabulous writing, excellent techniques, and complex structuring
    • Author’s exploration of different points of view in the novel, the use of closed third person narration for the three main characters and the selection of first person narration for the minor characters— members enjoyed the multiple narrator aspect
    • Found the minor characters fascinating and thought this was a testament to the often overlooked people who offer solace and kindness everyday
    • Liked that the novel was character-driven
    • Satisfaction in discovering how characters were connected
    • Members appreciated piecing all the characters together. One member stated it was like putting a puzzle together.
    • Lots of characters, probably an homage to being human and our interconnection with others as we travel through this world
    • Rich, complex, multi-layered, mesmerizing
    • Members were reminded of another novel previously selected for book club: The Spinning Heart by Donal Ryan. These books had a very similar format, structure, and character development.  Interestingly, the same members who liked Did You Ever Have A Family enjoyed The Spinning Heart, likewise, those that disliked Did You Ever Have A Family disliked The Spinning Heart.
  • The members who gave the novel low marks cited the following reasons:
    • Too many characters (at least 42) for a shorter book (219 pages)
    • Clegg frequently uses pronouns and descriptions instead of using first and/or last names which makes tracking the characters even more difficult
    • Members had difficulty in keeping track of all the characters and often felt lost
    • Due to the amount of characters, members felt that when they put the book down, they could no longer pick-up where they left off
    • Again, due to the number of characters, members who read the book weeks before had a difficult time remembering all the characters
    • One member politely said: I really enjoyed the discussion, but the novel wasn’t my style, way too many characters that are not clearly delineated.
    • Members were not invested in any of the characters

Resources:

From 14:51-21:07, Bill Clegg discusses his interesting hometown and its effect on his novel.

From 29:53-35:58, Bill Clegg reveals how he started his novel with this sentence,“She will go.”  p. 7 (paperback).  Additionally, Bill Clegg talks about his love for the “accidental pairing of people in life.”  This concept is definitely explored in his novel.

Check-Out Bill Clegg’s Memoirs!


Read-A-Likes:

did-you-ever-have-a-family

Book Club, RA Programs

The After Party -Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break – Jan. 2017

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Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break Discussions on Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari

Rating: In Books and Bagels, the book received ratings between 2.5 and 3.5. The average of the ratings was 3.2.  Three members declined to rate the book, citing that it would be unfair to rate as they disliked the book so much they could not finish it.

In Morning Book Break, the book received ratings between -1.0 and 5.0.  The average of the ratings was 1.97. About six members gave the book a zero and stated that they disliked the book and were unable to finish reading the book.

Review: Almost all members would not have chosen this book to read on their own. The Books and Bagels members, on the whole, were grateful to learn about new technologies and new communication tools that have emerged in our modern era.

How people meet their mates across different periods is a significant theme of Modern Romance therefore; last month, the members were asked to come prepared to share one of the following stories:

  • How did you and your significant other meet?
  • How did your parents or grandparents meet?
  • Share an interesting story about how a couple you know met.
  • Of course, members were also given the option to opt out.

The members were told that these shared stories would allow us to compare and contrast how people found their mates in the past and the present. Several members in Morning Book Break suggested bringing in wedding photos or photos of themselves as young singles and all members took this suggestion to heart and arrived with a photo to share. These stories and photos were well-received and this segment of the discussion was very popular.

At the end of our discussion time, members were asked to critique the book and answer the follow question:

  • Did Modern Romance help dispel the social stigma of online dating? If you were in your 20’s or 30’s would you use it as a tool?

The discussions in both groups were lively, fruitful, and interesting. Normally, the discussions end around 11 am, in both groups, the discussion lasted until almost noon.

Discussion Highlights—Books and Bagels

  • Several members did not care for the book, so they skimmed the contents or did not finish the book.
  • Most members found the comedian’s use of foul language to be off-putting, irritating, and a distraction to the contents of the book.
  • Some members questioned the methodology of the research studies conducted and they discovered that the statistics within the book did not add up.
  • Much discussion centered on how cell phone usage, specifically texting, has not only changed the dating scene, but ordinary, everyday conversations in general.
  • There was a great deal of discussion about the use of the internet and how googling has allowed us to search for the best which opens up endless options and yet, our lives are more complex and not necessarily happier.

Discussion Highlights—Morning Book Break

  • Most members did not care for Ansari’s humor. They found the humor to be boorish, insulting, and disrespectful. Some members found him to be humorous and a few enjoy his stand-up comedy routines.
  • Many members expressed concern for younger generation and their future; this brave new world seems to have lost the art of lively conversation. Many members were glad that they had been born in an earlier generation.  One member stated that colleges are now offering courses in conversation skills, indeed, a lost art.
  • Several members were not able to finish reading the book and those that did found it to be redundant and repetitive.
  • A few members shared that the information about romance in Japan, Buenos Aires, and France was interesting and informative.
  • A few members discussed the book with younger people over the holidays and found the information to spark lively and interesting conversations. A few people thought having knowledge about current romantic practices was paramount in interacting with the younger generation and on that note, thought the book offered insight.

Resources:

http://azizansari.com/

Read-a-Likes:

Modern Romance.jpg