Audiobooks, Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Morning Book Break – November 2017

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Morning Book Break Book Discussion on
Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate

Rating: This book received a variety of scores between 2.0 and 5.0.  In scoring, the mode was 4.0 and the average rating was 3.79.

Review: Only two members were aware of the abuses suffered under Georgia Tann and her adoption organization, the Tennessee Children’s Home Society. The book club members really appreciate learning about events in history, therefore, they found the historical information Wingate presented to be very interesting, heart-wrenching, and compelling.   All members were willing to give this novel a high score (5.0) for the research and historical material presented.

The fictional facet of the novel received mixed reviews. Many members loved the book and they have been recommending it to friends and family. They found the topic fascinating and they spent time conducting further research on the events presented. Many members said the mysterious aspect of the novel grabbed them and they looked forward each day to reading the book. Many found it to be a well-written, easy-read.

The discussion was interesting in that an equal number of members found the writing to be sophomoric and contrived. Many criticized the novel as it was more like a script for a sappy Hollywood or Lifetime movie as opposed to a literary read.  One member thought this might be a YA novel due to the writing style.

Members had differing opinions about the structure of the novel.  Some members were frustrated that the author shifted from 1939 to Present Day throughout the novel. Many thought this would be a tremendous book without the Present Day chapters and they wished the novel just covered the historical material about the shanty boat children—everyone was invested in the Foss children. Some members questioned why so many contemporary novels utilize dual-narration.  Members were confused by the amount of characters presented. One member said she took notes on the names of the characters and had to constantly revise the list. Members chuckled because they want to enjoy a book without having to take copious notes. Other members thoroughly appreciated the structure and felt it added an element of suspense to the novel.

Discussion Highlights:

  • The dual-narration structure of the novel and clarification of some of the roles of the main characters.
  • Discussion about the sisters’ decision to keep their family history secret. The group discussed whether family secrets should remain secret.
  • Discussion about whether the birth parents were responsible or careless individuals.
  • Was the ending realistic or unrealistic? What happens to Avery and Trent’s relationship?
  • Why the novel received worldwide interest? What themes are universal?
  • What can society do to prevent people like Georgia Tann from taking advantage of the most vulnerable?

Resources:

http://www.lisawingate.com/

A 60 Minutes report on the Tennessee Children’s Home Society scandal:

For other books by Lisa Wingate in our collection, please click here.

 

Read-a-Likes:

Before We Were Yours

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Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party–Books and Bagels–November 2017

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Books and Bagels Book Discussion on
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Rating: This book received a variety of scores between 3.0 and 4.5. In scoring, the mode was 4.50 and the average rating was 4.50.

Review: The novel was selected to represent our classic book this book club season. Most members had never read Fahrenheit 451 before and many members note the science fiction genre is not their usual fare. Members found the novel scary and disturbing, yet profound. Much discussion centered on the relevance for today and yet, the book was published in 1953 with symbolism related to atomic warfare, the Cold War, and McCarthyism. It is chilling to see Bradbury predict today’s environment! Additionally, Bradbury writes prophetically about a society without literature, where sheer entertainment and happiness is the goal for all citizens and however, the citizens are isolated, alienated, and committing suicide on a regular basis. Bradbury describes a world where people receive abbreviated information and spend their days with the TV “family.” The group discussed how twitter, texting, and reality shows mirror the society Bradbury described. Members discuss censorship, totalitarianism, and education. Members praised the role of libraries in providing information and access to all.
Some members found the characters underdeveloped, but cited this was obviously intentional. At times, it would have been helpful to know the characters back stories to understand why certain choices were made. The facilitator thinks it’s a great device that makes the reader’s mind continue to write the story. Some members found the book confusing and challenging and found that it took a while for the ideas to assimilate, but the book discussion and the Bradbury interview assisted.
Several members offered book recommendations. One member loves Bradbury’s poetic style and recommends Dandelion Wine, a hymn to summer. Another member noting the importance of books and book clubs recommended Dear Fahrenheit 451 : Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks: A Librarian’s Love Letters and Breakup Notes to the Books in Her Life by Annie Spence. Finally, one member suggested reading A Clockwork Orange, a violent, scary dystopian novel. One member commented on Bradbury’s talent in predicting the future and suggests reading “There Will Come Soft Rains” a short story by Ray Bradbury which was first published in 1950. Later that same year the story was included in Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles. This story prophetically introduces the reader to a computer-controlled house that does everything for the family.
Most members relayed that Ray Bradbury was indeed, a truly gifted writer and in many ways was prophetic. Most members would not have selected this science fiction book, but they were happy that it was a book club selection. The discussion, as always, was dynamic, insightful, and elevated the individual reading of the book.

Discussion Highlights:

• The role of leisure, education, and intellectual pursuits in societies
• Why suicide occurs frequently in this dystopian novel
• The role of Beatty as the story’s antagonist—Did Beatty want to die? Did Beatty program the Mechanical Hound? Firemen are “custodians of peace of mind,” so, how well are they accomplishing this task? Captain Beatty is a well-read man, so why hasn’t he been punished?
• What is the role of the Mechanical Hound?
• What role does Clarisse play in the novel? Did she leave the story too abruptly?
• Montag turns to books to liberate him; instead his life is in shambles. Does he benefit from books?
• In the future, when the war is over, do you believe the books, the “book people” carry inside themselves will make a difference?
• The novel was written in 1953, but describes a futuristic society that one could argue forecast what life is like today. Do you feel the novel’s revelation has come true?
• What conditions do you see in our world that parallels the story world?

Resources:
http://www.raybradbury.com/

Listen as Ray Bradbury discusses how Fahrenheit 451 came to be written:

 

Read-a-Likes: 

Fahrenheit 451