Book Club

The After Party – Morning Book Break – April 2017

untitled

Morning Book Break Discussion on The Marriage of Opposites by Alice Hoffman

Rating: The Marriage of Opposites received ratings between 4.0 and 5.0, with an overall average rating of 4.56.  

Review: The Marriage of Opposites received high marks from all book club members.  Members enjoy generational historical fiction with strong women characters and this novel delivered in these aspects.  We enjoyed a fascinating discussion about the life and times of the father of Impressionism, Camille Pissarro.

Discussion Highlights:

  • Several members appreciated the structure of the novel including the way the chapters were entitled.  This was useful in tracking both the timeline and the vast amount of characters.
  • (Spoiler alert!) Several members were haunted by Lydia’s abduction.  Members were horrified to learn it would be twenty years before she saw her mother again.
  • All members were transfixed by Alice Hoffman’s descriptive language which transported them to the sights, smells, and sounds of St. Thomas and Paris circa the 1800’s. Members loved the vibrant, accurate descriptions of St. Thomas and Paris.  Members who have traveled to these locations felt the author captured them exquisitely.  One member said she literally could feel the humidity of the island.  Members thought the writing in The Marriage of Opposites was the work of a gifted, talent artist—one who could write skillfully about another artist.  Hoffman definitely understands the emotions conveyed on a canvas.  
  • Several members stated that the novel was a quick read and they were unable to put it down. Many chores and necessary tasks at home were left undone!
  • Members enjoyed the compelling characters with such interesting lives.
  • Sadly, members wished we had more time to discuss some of the motifs and magical realism presented in the novel, especially the turtle-girl/woman.

Resources:

The members viewed several of Pissarro’s paintings and then they were asked the following question:

Did any of Pissarro’s paintings that remind you of scenes in the novel?
How does
The Marriage of Opposites convey Pissarro’s style?

You can view some of Pissarro’s paintings by clicking here.

Read-a-Likes:

The Marriage of Opposites

Book Club

The After Party – Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break – Nov. 2016

untitled

Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break Book Discussions on The Swans of Fifth Avenue

Rating:  In Books and Bagels, the book received ratings between 2.5  and 4.0. The average rating was 3.5.  In Morning Book Break, this novel received a variety of scores between -1.0 and 4.0.  The average rating was 3.0.

Review:  The novel was selected as part of a two-month combination study.  The Swans of Fifth Avenue was selected to provide insight into the life of the literary genius, Truman Capote. In December, the book clubs will read In Cold Blood, Capote’s non-fiction masterpiece. Capote is often credited as establishing the true-crime genre.  Next month, the clubs will discuss whether reading The Swans of Fifth Avenue offered any insight into Truman Capote’s literary rise and fall. We will discuss whether members appreciated reading The Swans of Fifth Avenue in combination with In Cold Blood.

Most members in both groups felt the high society life displayed in the novel was nothing like the life most Americans live. The groups found the characters to be superficial, pretentious and deeply flawed. Most members could not identify with these characters and for that matter, did not want to.

However, club members did enjoy the group discussions and many enjoyed reminiscing about this period of time.

Discussion Highlights – Morning Book Break

  • Most members found the book to be an easy, somewhat entertaining read, but most members did not find it to be a compelling novel.
  • Many members cared very little about the characters. They found the characters to be shallow and they did not admire them. Members found the characters to be deeply flawed and members were grateful for their own lives.
  • Several members struggled to complete the book and some even skimmed over sections.
  • Many members were disappointed with Melanie Benjamin’s repetitive writing style. They were surprised they disliked this book because they had thoroughly enjoyed a previous club selection, The Aviator’s Wife, by the same author, which had received ratings between 4.0 and 5.0 with an average rating of 4.5.

Discussion Highlights – Books and Bagels

  • Most members did not connect with the characters and in fact, they did not find any of the characters to be sympathetic.
  • A few members felt the novel provided a thought-provoking glimpse into Truman Capote’s literary genius.
  • Members were not surprised that Truman Capote betrayed his friends by writing “La Cote, Basque 1965”.
  • Several members thought Melanie Benjamin was masterful in evoking powerful images in two particular scenes:
    1. Truman’s gentle removal of Babe’s makeup—revealing her true self for the first time.
    2. William Paley’s one-night stand cover-up.

Resources:

http://melaniebenjamin.com/

babe-paley-truman-capote
Truman Capote and Babe Paley
5
William and Babe Paley with Truman Capote at their house in Round Hill, Jamaica

Read-a-Likes:

The Swans of Fifth Avenue.jpg

Displays

Summer Reading Displays

For the Summer Reading Program, Reader’s Advisory puts out different displays in our area that tie into the overarching summer theme.  For this summer’s theme, “Read to the Rhythm,” our book, music, and movie displays are all about music!  Anything that is on the cubes can be checked out, just like anything else in the library!

Right now, there are five different displays going.

The first book cube is a split between “Battle Cry of Freedom,” Civil War fiction inspired by the music of that period, specifically the soundtrack of Ken Burns’ The Civil War, and “The Rake’s Song,” Regency romances with rakes and rogues inspired by the album The Hazards of Love by The Decemberists.

The second book cube is a split between “Yesterday,” selections of historical fiction inspired by the classic Beatles tune, and “Mammas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys,” western novels whose choice were inspired by Willie Nelson and Waylon Jenning’s cover of a seminal country song by Ed Bruce.

The music display is “Stayin’ Alive”, a rip roaring collection of 70s albums that will keep you dancing disco, inspired, of course, by the Bee Gees.

The movie display is “I Will Survive,” a selection of disaster movies inspired by Gloria Gaynor’s hit song.

The teen display is “To Infinity, and Beyond!” inspired by the movie Toy Story and its soundtrack, featuring science fiction.

Come in and check out these displays for yourself; you can always take something home!

IMG_1890 IMG_1891 IMG_1892 IMG_1894 IMG_1896