Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break – October 2018

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Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break Book Discussion Groups on
Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran

Ratings:
The Books and Bagels Book Discussion group members rated the book between a 3.5 and 4.5 with one member giving the book a 3.0 and another member rating the book at 5.0. The average of the ratings was 4.03.

The Morning Book Break Book Discussion group rated the book between a 3.0 and 4.0, with one member giving the book a 2.0 and one member giving the book a 5.0. The average of the ratings was 3.69.

Several members gave the book a higher rating because the discussion was so poignant.

Review:
Overall members enjoyed this read and learned a lot about the immigrant experience. Members were conflicted about parts of the book. Many members had a hard time getting into the book.  Some members liked the first half better and some members liked the second half better. Some members liked the way the book ended and some members strongly disliked the way the book ended.  Overall, members were thankful that the story was not a Hollywood ending. Based on September’s book club read (a Hollywood ending), one member did not want to read the last 10 or so pages, she was worried that the author was going to wrap-up the book and all the characters into a nice neat little package—so, finally, when the member read the end, she was happily surprised that it was not a tidy ending.  The ending is complex and rang true to real life, in that, issues and people are multi-faceted without simple solutions. Most members agreed with this member’s assessment.

Some members thought the book was well-written and others thought the book needed editing.  One member thought that maybe the author had fallen in love with the sound of her own voice.  Although, members thought the author did a good job of developing sympathetic characters; the book was still too long.

Members appreciated the research the author did to bring readers the story.  Members enjoyed learning about both cultures. Members thought this was a timely book and they enjoyed exploring multiple sides to an issue.

Discussion Highlights:

  • The groups discussed how the novel explores motherhood from the main character’s perspectives and from minor character’s perspectives.  Although, the title is Lucky Boy, the author states, “This story, this fight for a boy—it wasn’t about the boy.  It was about his mothers.” The author created sympathy for both Kavya and Soli, by spending so much time developing their characters.  We discussed the key differences between Soli’s and Kavya’s approach to motherhood. We discussed which woman we most related to.
  • Soli travels to America riding on La Bestia, while Kavya’s family arrived by more traditional means.  So, we discussed the novel’s portrayal of privileged versus unprivileged immigration. We briefly discussed Soli’s treatment in immigrant detention.
  • When Rishi is asked if he wants a child, he thinks “Children had seemed like a project planted permanently in the future.  A certainty about which he never thought he’d be asked. Had anyone asked his own father if he’d wanted a baby?” We discussed how the novel portrays fatherhood and whether it is different than motherhood.
  • The group discussed how the novel portrays class stratification.  We also talked about whether the classic idea of the American dream is still attainable.
  • The story was set on the fictional Weebies campus in Silicon Valley and we discussed how the setting shaped the novel.
  • The facilitator asked the group, how they felt about the ending and whether, or not, they were surprised.  (Spoiler alert) We talked about Kavya’s decision to fight to keep Iggy. We talked about whether or not Soli should have made a different choice.
  • We discussed the title and if, indeed, Ignacio was a lucky boy.

Resources:
Each year the clubs read the Suburban Mosaic selection.  The Suburban Mosaic is a Community Reading Program for suburban communities in Cook and Lake County with the mission of fostering cultural understanding through literature.
The participating organizations are: Des Plaines Public Library, Elk Grove Village Public Library, Lincolnwood Public Library, Mount Prospect Public Library, Palatine Public Library, Prospect Heights Public Library, Rolling Meadows Public Library, Schaumburg Twp. District Library, School Districts 15, 23, 25, 26, 54, 57, and 63, District 214 Community Education, Harper College, National-Louis University, and
the Daily Herald Newspaper.

Lucky Boy
was the adult selection for 2017-2018.

For further information, please see flyer below:

suburban-mosaic-2017-june21-page-001

suburban-mosaic-2017-june21-page-002

Read-a-Likes:

Lucky Boy

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new DVDs, reader's advisory

New DVDs – November 2018

The following films have been added to our collection during the month of November.
MPAA ratings follow each title in parentheses, with (NR) denoting the film is not rated.  If a language other than English follows the film title, the film will be in that language with optional English subtitles.

Bad Samaritan (R)
The Cakemaker (German and Hebrew)(NR)
The Children Act (R)
The Darkest Minds (PG-13)
Date With Love (TV-G)
The Devil’s Doorway (NR)
A Gentleman: Sundar Susheel Risky (Hindi)(NR)
Ideal Home (NR)
In Harmony (French)(NR)
Juliet, Naked (R)
Mile 22 (R)
Never Goin’ Back (R)
Our House (PG-13)
Padman (Hindi)(PG-13)
Papillon (2017)(R)
The Price (NR)
Scorpion King: Book of Souls (PG-13)
Slender Man (PG-13)
The Spy Who Dumped Me (R)
This is Our Land (French)(NR)
Toilet: Ek Prem Katha (Hindi)(NR)

Updated 11/9/18

reader's advisory, Slideshows

Book Lover’s Day 2018 Wrap-Up

October 18th was Book Lover’s Day 2018!  This is our annual program to share books that we as a department have loved over the past year and have a pleasant luncheon while enjoying fiction and nonfiction titles.  This year’s theme was Book Lovers in Paradise.

We had a full house again this year; every seat was filled!

If you were unable to join us, or want a refresher on what books were spoken about, below you will find the slide show from Book Lover’s Day 2018 as well as an alphabetical book list by author of the titles presented.  Click on any of the titles in the book list to see them in our catalog.

Please feel free to ask questions or reserve a book via the comments!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A Colorful Way of Living: How to Be More, Create More, Do More
the Vera Bradley Way
 
by Barbara Bradley Baekgaard
(Inspirational Non-Fiction)

Snap by Belinda Bauer
(Suspense Fiction)

The Immortalists  by Chloe Benjamin
(Literary Fiction)

The Girls in the Picture by Melanie Benjamin
(Historical Fiction)

The Wife by Alafair Burke
(Psychological Suspense)

 The Lost for Words Bookshop by Stephanie Butland
(Contemporary Romance)

My Lady’s Choosing by Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris
(Interactive Romance)

Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser
(Frontier Life Non-Fiction)

Dread Nation by Justina Ireland
(Alternate History/Horror)

The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers by Maxwell King
(Biography)

The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal
(Alternate History/Science Fiction)

A Criminal Defense by William L. Myers, Jr.
(Legal Thriller)

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
(Family Drama)

Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
(Historical Fiction)

Baby Teeth by Zoje Stage
(Horror/Thriller)

Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Morning Book Break and Books and Bagels – September 2018

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Morning Book Break and Books and Bagels Book Discussion Groups on
The Book That Matters Most by Ann Hood

Ratings:
The Books and Bagels Book Discussion group members rated the book between a 3.0 and 4.0 with one member giving the book a 1.5. The average of the ratings was 3.61.

The Morning Book Break Book Discussion group rated the book between a 2.5 and 4.0, with one member giving the book a 1.5. The average of the ratings was 2.91.

Review:
Members enjoyed the premise of the book.  They liked the idea of reading about a book club which allows members to communicate, grow, and change.  They liked that book clubs have the potential to support and uplift others and form friendship.  Members thought Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break Book Discussion Groups are much more engaging than the club portrayed in the novel. Members really, really enjoy our sessions!

The novel as a whole did not receive the marks that other novels discussed at book club have received.  Several members have recommended this book to others as a “nice read.” Several members were not impressed with the author’s writing ability.  Many members didn’t care about any of the characters—this is a tell-tale sign of dislike for these book discussion groups.  The groups really enjoy stories when they care deeply about the characters. Members felt there were too many dysfunctional people in the book.  Some members had great expectations for the book and were highly disappointed.

Several members disliked the book and found the characters poorly developed, shallow, and flat.  They found the structure too loose and the writing seemed padded.  They felt the book needed more editing.  The facilitator shared with the groups that Ann Hood’s original submission was twice as long as the published novel.  The groups laughed as they definitely would not read her 720 page novel and they still agreed that the novel needed more editing.

A few members were conflicted about the book. They felt the main character, Ava, whined throughout the book and they were sick of her attitude. Members disliked the chapters which showed Ava’s daughter’s addiction to drugs. They felt those were too graphic. The facilitator noted in Ann Hood’s interview, her editor actually cut large portions of the addiction scenes out the book.  The editor told Ann Hood that the public wouldn’t be able to handle it. One member felt the addiction segments were accurately portrayed until the ending—she felt if Ann Hood truly understood drug addiction, Ava’s daughter Maggie would not be on the mend at the end of the novel.

Members had much to say about the ending.  Many thought the ending was too contrived and abrupt.  Members thought the author got tired of writing and wrapped all her characters up in the last five pages. They found the ending lacking and disappointing.  Members could not understand how a mother could fake her own death while her child was young, only to show up when her daughter was an adult. The mother and daughter did not have any kind of severe reaction to this trauma—this scenario did not ring true in any way to real life, so it felt contrived.  Members thought the ending seemed like a Hollywood ending which did not match the tone of the rest of the book.

The novel addressed the power of book clubs:
On page 356, “Ava looked around at these people {the book club} who had brought her into this group, who had watched her struggle and try and fail and, finally, stand here with them, more confident.  Even, she realized, hopeful.  She imagined the year ahead, watching movies at Kiki’s and bringing in snacks one night and helping Diana through radiation after her surgery.  She imagined books, dozens of them, piling up on her shelves, growing dog-eared and worn, read and reread, highlighted and scribbled on.  She imagined books and this book group getting her though whatever was coming next.”

Members liked that in tandem with the PBS series The Great American Read, we discussed our personal favorite reads.  This was a heartwarming and touching portion of the discussion group.  We extended our meeting time for an additional hour to cover this portion of the meeting.  The facilitator is compiling the list of books for each member to keep. Members felt this was the best part of the discussion.

Discussion Highlights:

  • The members discussed Ava’s reasons for joining a book club and the discussion centered on members’ own reasons for joining book club.  Members enjoy having deeper discussions about the books they read.  Club is a safe place to explore ideas, change, and grow.  Often other members bring new insights and thoughts to the selection. Members enjoy developing relationships with other book lovers. Members also find that prior to joining a book club; they would read basically similar types of books.  They wanted to join book club to expand their reading tastes and read books they would not pick out on their own.
  • We discussed Ava’s book club journey coupled with her emotional journey, which is a coming-of-age story.  Ava initially “couldn’t remember the last book she’d read that mattered at all.  In fact, she purposely chose books that didn’t matter to her.” Ava, as a child, got lost in books, but after the death of her sister and mother, Ava ignored books. We discussed how the death of her mother influenced her and her own parenting.
  • The theme for Ava’s book club is the book that matters most.  Over a ten month period, each book club member is asked to pick the book that is most significant to them.  We discussed the lessons Ava and the other members learn from each book selected.
  • We discussed how Ava is transformed as she reads and discusses each book.  Ann Hood, the author, had the book club premise in mind and decided to select 10 books that the club would read.  Ann Hood did research by asking everyone she encountered, what the most important book was to them.  Ann Hood had a large notebook to compile the list, but what she found is that the same 24 books repeated themselves.  Based on the plot, she selected 9 books from the list of 24 and reread the books for The Book That Matters Most.
    • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen is selected by Penny Frost, Radcliffe ’47.The facilitator spent a decent amount of time explaining possible ways the main character, Ava is transformed by reading each book presented at book club.  Below are short summaries of the facilitator’s main points:The book deals with courtship and marriage—issues Ava doesn’t want to read about since she is recently divorced and this topic is hurtful.  Ava decides not to read the book, but supplements by watching the movie.  At book club, Ava is embarrassed because she is caught cheating and to fit in with the members, she states she is bringing the author of her book selection, From Clare to Here (a fictional book) to the meeting.
    • Luke selects The Great Gatsby as his favorite book as it had given him the courage to hope beyond his own circumstances. Ava is transformed by this selection in that she realizes that the American dream is an illusion, so she opens up to John about her divorce and John assures her that there are many types of grief.
    • Diana, a breast cancer survivor and local actress, selects Anna Karenina which deals with adultery and the restrictions of society on women. Ava is currently dealing with her husband who committed adultery and Ava is impressed with the thought that we “fool ourselves into believing that we are happy.” This resonates with Ava and she begins to wonder why she has tricked herself.
    • Ruth, mother of the year with six children, selects One Hundred Years of Solitude (meant to be ironic). When Ava reads this book at the beach, the words rush over her mind and the solitude of reading is creating a place for the suppressed memories of Ava’s past to come forward.
    • Honor, previous babysitter for Ava, now working as English literature professor, selected To Kill a Mockingbird as she wrote her dissertation on Atticus Finch. She feels that Finch is a perfect example of a moral compass in that, he never loses faith in human kind. Ann Hood uses this novel to show the readers that Ava and daughter, Maggie, are like Scout (character in To Kill a Mockingbird) in that, they are also going through a transformation.  The readers realize that The Book That Matters Most is a coming-of-age story.  Ava begins to confront the memories she had before the death of her mother and sister.
    • Monique, Ava’s school friend, selects A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. A tree is chopped down in this novel, but there is still a living branch, which is symbolic of hope.  Ava at this point in the novel is in need of hope for her daughter, Maggie.
    • Kiki, a counter girl, who Ava thinks is inept, selects the coming-of-age story, Catcher in the Rye. Holden (character from Catcher in the Rye) is angry at the phoniness in the world, which made Kiki think about the anger she felt when her parents divorced. This discussion at book club makes Ava think about her daughter who first started having issues when she and her husband were having marital difficulties.
    • Jennifer selects The Unbearable Lightness of Being which deals with the dichotomy of light vs. heavy and paradoxes that cannot be resolved. At this point, Ava is reminded of the paradox in her own life—how could her own mother leave her—this is the main issue Ava has been working through most of her life which is why the fictional book From Clare to Here is so meaningful.  Ava is becoming more independent and stronger; she realizes that even though her husband would like to get back together, she does not have to make this choice.
    • John, a recent widower, selects Slaughterhouse 5 because it is how he met his wife in college. She helped him with a Slaughterhouse 5 college assignment and they were together from that day until her death.  In Slaughterhouse 5, the main character Billy is unstuck in time and every moment of time is occurring and reoccurring simultaneously in his life.  This is how Ava feels; she is now fully evolved and realizes that she is not a victim and she tells her daughter that, “the choices we make are own.”
    • Ava chooses the fictional book From Clara to Here, which Ava discovers is a book her mother wrote in an attempt to explain why she left Ava as a young girl.

Many members thought Ann Hood’s use of great literature throughout the book was too simplistic and shallow.  One member stated, “I read the novel, as it was written, with little insight into the great works of fiction and in that way, the books were just a part of the story.  They were not meant to be symbolic or deep.”

Resources:
Listen as Ann Hood discusses her novel The Book That Matters Most:

Visit Ann Hood’s website to learn about her
and her other fantastic novels.

For books and audiobooks in our collection by Ann Hood, please click here.

Read-a-Likes:

The Book That Matters Most

As a tie-in to the PBS program The Great American Read and the novel The Book That Matters Most, members were asked to bring 1-3 most beloved book titles to the September club meeting. Members discussed their favorite books. Titles only will be shared at a later date. The Great American Read concluded with the Grand Finale on October 23, 2018 revealing To Kill A Mockingbird as the best-loved book.

 https://player.pbs.org/viralplayer/3017588458/

From the Reference Desk, reader's advisory

From the Reference Desk

Please enjoy some romantic reviews…

lauren reviews

Alyssa Cole’s Reluctant Royals series continues to be delightful. The second book, A Duke By Default, follows the adventures of Portia Hobbs, best friend of Ledi (who starred in A Princess In Theory) as she leaves behind New York and continues her quest to build a life free from her past mistakes. The book kicks off with sass and assertiveness, and it rollicks merrily along towards the end with all the ups, downs, and loop-de-loops of a roller coaster. Bonus: not only do we get Portia’s point of view, we also get Tavish’s. If you like second-chance romances, smart, capable characters aware of their flaws, and contemporary romance that not only riffs off the tropes but emphasizes the obligation of those in power to serve the people, read these. Also, Tavish’s family is multi-cultural and fabulous, and the author has so many delightfully geeky jokes in the book. (Book 3 is slated to star Ledi’s cousin Nya and the prince who comes to help Tavish deal with being a duke. All signs point to another good story on its way…and hopefully more books after that, because there are multiple other major supporting characters I’d love to read as main characters.)

26067984

I Thee Wed by Celeste Bradley is a historical romance. However, we get a heroine who is not the only woman with a degree in her family (historically accurate), an antagonist with sadly realistic villainy, and a hero who yearns for orderly quiet only to find that he misses the chaos of his family and needs to use a social script to function in most situations. Between science, bewildering feelings (neither main character is initially pleased by the disruption of attraction), and Orion’s youngest sister Atalanta, who is a force to be reckoned with and equally at odds with society’s expectations as her brother, there’s always something happening. Plenty of drama, yes, but in the end there’s happiness to spare.

new DVDs, reader's advisory

New DVDs – October 2018

The following films have been added to our collection during the month of October.
MPAA ratings follow each title in parentheses, with (NR) denoting the film is not rated.  If a language other than English follows the film title, the film will be in that language with optional English subtitles.

Adrift (PG-13)
Back to Burgundy (French)(PG-13)
Billionaire Boys Club (R)
Breaking In (PG-13)
The Catcher Was a Spy (R)
Damsel (R)
Darrow & Darrow: In the Key of Murder (NR)
Distorted (R)
Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (R)
The Endless (NR)
Fahrenheit 451 (TV-MA)
The First Purge (R)
Flint (TV-14)
Hereditary (R)
Hotel Artemis (R)
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (PG-13)
A Kid Like Jake (R)
Leave No Trace (PG)
Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (PG-13)
Manifesto (NR)
Occupation (R)
Ocean’s Collection (including Ocean’s 8, 11, 12, & 13)(PG-13)
On Chesil Beach (R)
Operation Red Sea (Chinese)(R)
The Seagull (PG-13)
Sicario: Day of the Soldado (R)
Skyscraper (PG-13)
Sollers Point (R)
Solo: A Star Wars Story (PG-13)
Sweet Country (R)
Superfly (2018)(R)
Super Troopers 2 (R)
Tag (R)
The 12th Man (Norwegian)(PG-13)
Unfriended: Dark Web (R)
Uncle Drew (PG-13)
Warning Shot (R)

Updated 10/29/18

new DVDs, reader's advisory

New DVDs for September 2018

The following films have been added to our collection during the month of September.
MPAA ratings follow each title in parentheses, with (NR) denoting the film is not rated.  If a language other than English follows the film title, the film will be in that language with optional English subtitles.

Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Bleeding Steel (English and Chinese)(R)
Book Club (PG-13)
The Child in Time (TV-14)
Deadpool 2 (R)
Love at First Bark (NR)
Nostalgia (R)
The Party (R)
Paterno (TV-MA)
Sheikh Jackson (Arabic)(NR)
Site Unseen: An Emma Fielding Mystery (TV-G)
Song of Granite (NR)
Truth or Dare (PG-13)

 

updated 9/17/18

Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Morning Book Break and Books and Bagels – June 2018

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Morning Book Break and Book Discussion Groups on
The Women in the Castle by Jessica Shattuck

Ratings:
The Books and Bagels Book Discussion group members rated the book between a 4.0 and 4.5 with one member giving the book a 3.5 and another member rating the book at 3.75. The average of the ratings was 4.13.

The Morning Book Break Book Discussion group rated the book between a 4.0 and 5.0, with one member giving the book a 3.0 and one member giving the book a 3.5. The average of the ratings was 4.10.

Review:
Most members found the novel to be well-written and enlightening.  Members liked learning about Germany in the aftermath of World War II.  Members felt the book shed light on how difficult it is to rebuild after a war. Many members gained new insights into the complexities of life that many ordinary Germans experienced.  Members somewhat sympathized with decisions made by ordinary Germans living in dangerous, unsettling times. The groups discussed how difficult it is to make decisions without prior knowledge of consequences farther down the road.  Members enjoyed Shattuck’s ability to make the reader really care about these flawed women. One member thought that she had her mind made up about the three women, only to change her opinion at the end—the member gives Shattuck credit for creating well-drawn characters.

Many members liked the novel more than they thought they would.  They enjoyed learning new information about life for ordinary Germans during this period of time and they thought the author did an excellent job of painting humanity with a gray brush.

Several members found the structure of the novel confusing.  They found it hard to keep track of the characters and the time-line.  The story is not told in a linear format—the author moves around in time with the characters.  The facilitator felt Jessica Shattuck did a wonderful job with the format—she created a nonlinear novel that grabs the reader’s attention.  Several members did however, like that the book had a beginning, middle, and end.

Additionally, several members were confused by the novel’s geographical shifts; they found this difficult to track—this could have been mitigated by having access to the map included in Jessica Shattuck’s website—they wish the map had been included in the book.  

Some members found it difficult to understand how Ania obtained a new identity. This was only covered in a cursory way in one paragraph on page 269 (paperback version).

Several members were unable to finish the book; the novel brought back too many difficult memories and horrors of the war.  These members bravely attended book discussion and still brought their experiences and insights which were helpful and inspiring.

According to Jessica Shattuck the novel is as much about “complicity as it is about resistance.  It is a story set at the edges of the Holocaust, rather than at its darkest center—in the gray area of everyday lives.  It is also a book about the period after the war rather than the war itself, a time when guilt of having supported Hitler—of having been complicit in the Holocaust—was driven underground and inward.  And this private space of the subconscious and repressed has always been the province of novels.”

Jessica Shattuck attempted to answer the following questions from three characters’ points of view: “How did the forces of the time shape the everyday moments of people’s lives?  How much did “ordinary Germans” know of what was happening in concentration camps and small Polish villages?  How did some people recognize evil as it unfolded while others remained blind?”   Members believe Shattuck answered these questions through the three characters’ circumstances and choices—which was a remarkable feat. Members thought Jessica Shattuck achieved her goal by offering readers a different glimpse at life for Germans from 1938-1991.

The book posits the following questions: What would I do in similar circumstances?  How do I stand up for injustices today? After reading The Women in the Castle, the answers are not as black and white as one might think.

Members have read other novels about Nazi Germany which they felt had insights, like The Lilac Girls, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, and Sarah’s Key.  In contrast, members felt The Women in the Castle offered new insights that these other novels did not.  In other words, The Women in the Castle covered new ground.  Only one member had read a nonfiction book which addressed this period of time in a similar way.  The member highly recommended this book, Two Lives: A Memoir by Vikram Seth. “Widely acclaimed as one of the world’s greatest living writers, Vikram Seth — author of the international bestseller A Suitable Boy — tells the heartrending true story of a friendship, a marriage, and a century. Weaving together the strands of two extraordinary lives — Shanti Behari Seth, an immigrant from India who came to Berlin to study in the 1930s, and Helga Gerda Caro, the young German Jewish woman he befriended and later married — Two Lives is both a history of a violent era seen through the eyes of two survivors and an intimate, unforgettable portrait of a complex, abiding love.”—from Amazon

Discussion Highlights:

  • The groups discussed ways they related to the three main characters and discussed which character they identified with the most.  Members talked about how each woman’s past influenced their decisions during the rise of Nazi Germany. We discussed whether the women would have been friends if not for the war and how the events of the war shaped each of the women and their perceptions of themselves.  
  • The groups discussed whether Marianne was a good protector and friend to Benita and Ania. We discussed how Marianne may have reacted if Ania and Benita had been more honest with her.
  • The groups discussed whether Benita’s beauty helped or hurt her and we discussed her true feelings for both Connie and Franz Muller.  We discussed Benita’s final choice and the implications for her son, Martin.
  • The groups discussed whether Ania was like most ordinary Germans of the period.
  • At the end of the war, each woman was in a different place emotionally.  We discussed the choices they made to survive and whether it’s possible for anyone to put the past behind and create a new beginning.  We discussed whether we felt the women were victims or whether they had responsibility for Hitler’s rise to power and therefore responsibility for their own plights.  We also discussed whether people are accountable for the actions of their leaders.
  • The groups were asked whether they learned anything new about the conditions in post-war Germany.
  • Finally, the groups responded to the following statement by Martin, “Americans can face the world with open arms, Marianne had once said, because the world hasn’t yet come to knock it down.”   Additionally, the groups were asked if The Women in the Castle holds any insights for our own time.

Resources:

Jessica Shattuck’s website includes a YouTube clip which is essential to understanding the personal nature of this novel for the author.  The website also contains book discussion questions and an extremely helpful map with sound bites about The Castle, Displaced Persons Camps, POW Camps, Rheinwienlager (US army camps built to hold German soldiers) and the Landjahr Lager (country service camp).

http://jessicashattuck.com/

If you decide to read The Women in the Castle, please be aware that the paperback copy has an additional chapter which further explains Ania’s identity—some members found this very useful. The facilitator agrees with the editor’s choice to remove this chapter from the original manuscript.  While this additional chapter is interesting and descriptive, it does not provide for a seamless storyline and creates additional questions which remain unanswered in the rest of the text. The facilitator said, “The additional chapter is like having an antique hammer in a sock drawer, while interesting, it is a misfit in the sock drawer.”

Book club members also expressed that the relationship between Martin and Mary in 1991 should have been edited out of the novel—it was out of place with the rest of the novel according to the members.

The paperback includes a fascinating and helpful Author’s Note.  The facilitator highly recommends reading the Author’s Note after completing the novel.

Tie-In DVDs in RML’s collection

 

Read-a-Likes:

The Women in the Castle

Book Club 2016-2017 Season Wrap-Up:

Members praised the facilitator for providing a stellar selection of diverse books this season. Members appreciate the selections as the books offered topics rich for discussion.  Members thoroughly enjoy attending discussion days and while many would not have pick-up these reads on their own, they were so thankful to be stretched intellectually by reading other genres.  Last season (2016-2017) there was several least favorite reads, but this season all the selections were enjoyed by the members.

Several Morning Book Break members were only slightly disappointed with Beartown as they were hopeful it would have been as heartwarming and touching as A Man Called Ove.  Many members stated that it was hard to pick a favorite read of the season, as the books on the list were all well-liked.  Some of favorites for this season were:  A Gentleman in Moscow, The Rosie Project, Before We Were Yours, News of the World, The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, and Small Great Things—almost the entire selection were book club favorites!

Finally, members were asked to cast a vote on which of the two novels they would most like to read for the upcoming season.  The novels were: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho and The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn.  The Books and Bagels Book Club voted for the The Alchemist and The Morning Book Break Book Club voted for The Woman in the Window.

Members are sorry to see the season come to a close and they can’t wait until September for the first discussion of the 2018-2019 Season.  A few members feel like they are going to go into Book Club Withdrawal!  If you’re interested in attending, stop by the Readers’ Advisory Desk for the 2018-2019 Flyer, which will be available in mid-July, and sign-up with a Readers’ Advisor. If you’re already signed up, check out the blog page for September’s title!

Book Club, reader's advisory

The After Party – Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break – May 2018

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Books and Bagels and Morning Book Break Book Discussion Groups on
Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult

Ratings:
The Books and Bagels Book Discussion group members rated the book between a 4.0 and 5.0. The average of the ratings was 4.64.

The Morning Book Break Book Discussion group rated the book between a 4.0 and 5.0, with one member giving the book a 3.0. The average of the ratings was 4.49.

Review:
Several members are huge Jodi Picoult fans and they were glad the facilitator finally chose a Picoult book.  Members knew right away that this “issue-oriented” Picoult novel would be perfect for book discussion.  Readers liked that the book was beautifully researched and they thought the Author’s Note at the end showed the author’s careful construction about the sensitive issue of racism. Members thought that they would recommend the Author’s Note to readers who would not read the novel (the Author’s Note does contain spoilers).  Members appreciate that Picoult used her readership/fan-base to promote a difficult topic that is close to her heart.  Members liked that the reading was accessible while challenging readers to recognize subtle racism.  Ms. Picoult involves her readers in a gentle way, asking them to ponder some very difficult questions.  Jodi Picoult is well-known for getting readers to develop empathy for her characters with her use of descriptive language.  She takes readers on an emotional journey as she writes well-drawn believable characters.  Readers genuinely care about her characters which contribute to them being memorable.  Even the secondary characters are well-drawn, such as the mothers of Ruth and Kennedy. Members like that Picoult used the main characters names as chapter titles—no guessing is required to understand which voice is being presented.

Members thought Small Great Things would be terrific as a movie and indeed, Viola Davis and Julia Roberts are slated to star in the movie version.

Several members thought the book was too long, which conflicted with the ending.  Members thought the novel wrapped up too quickly.

Many members felt the discussion was timely in light of current events and felt the overall message was hopeful.  Members think the book is an important read and members commented on the fantastic line-up of books the past several months at club which in combination gave historical and current views.

Discussion Highlights:

  • The group discussed ways they related to the three main characters.  Many members related to Ruth as an intelligent, hard-working single mother.  Members related to Kennedy as a liberal minded woman juggling the roles of motherhood and her career as a lawyer.  Like Jodi Picoult, all of the members were disgusted by Turk’s behavior, but some members felt Picoult showed how his troubled childhood contributed to his radicalization. We discussed what the role of parenting meant to each of the three characters.  We discussed the ways each of the three characters changed over the course of the novel.  We discussed how Ruth’s relationship with her sister Adisa changed over the course of the novel.  We spent a good deal of time talking about Turk’s transformation.  Many members thought his transformation was too incredible to be believable and yet, Picoult spent time interviewing past members of white supremacist groups to get the voice right and draw a clear picture of how it is possible for members to leave the group and work to undo racism.
  • Several members are regular Jodi Picoult readers and they enjoy her signature twists, however several other members felt the twists to be so contrived that they actually lowered their overall score.
  • In the novel, Kennedy seeks out a neighborhood in which she is the only white person to help her gain some perspective. Members were asked to think of a time when something about their identity made them an outsider and how were they affected by that experience.  Members shared many intimate anecdotal stories—through her Social Justice research Jodi Picoult discovered that open discussions about racial issues are vital and important.
  • The title of the book comes from a Martin Luther King, Jr. quote that Ruth’s mother mentions on p. 173: “If I cannot do great things, I can do small things in a great way.” We discussed what the quote means to us and cited some example of small great things done by the characters in the novel.
  • Finally, we discussed the difference between “equity” and “equality” as explained in the novel.  We discussed whether or not our perspectives on racism or privilege were changed or challenged by the reading of the book.

Resources:

Read Jodi Picoult’s website to learn about her
and her other fantastic novels:  https://www.jodipicoult.com/

PBS Books interviews Jodi Picoult on small great things at Book Expo 2016—Chicago:

For books and audiobooks in our collection by Jodi Picoult, please click here.

Read-a-Likes:

Small Great Things